How to Find Your Perfect Massage Therapist

Massage has become one of the most popular treatments over the past few years and the need for a good massage is only increasing as more of our work and even some of our social activities are desk or computer based.

When I first trained in massage therapy in the early 90’s, clients would normally visit the salon or spa for waxing, facials or for slimming treatments. Massage was one of the treatments which were considered as being a luxury or a special treat once in a blue moon.

I must admit back then life was very different for people generally, many clients would have a secretary or assistant to type up work. For some, once you finished work that was it as there was no emails to check as not everyone had the internet. Very few people had laptops so sitting on the sofa or in bed whilst working was very minimal and finally ‘Googling’ and social networking was near non-existent.

Coming in today things have changed. Many no longer have outcall massage hong kong secretary’s so they have to deal with admin themselves, most work is done on the computer, some at desks and some in awkward positions whilst sitting on the sofa or lying in bed. Long gone are the days when once you left the office your work would be over, now we can be contacted on our mobiles or can check our emails at home if not on the way. Our working day still continues even after we’ve left the office or even before we’ve reached the office.

1) Online Reviews

Firstly, online reviews are a great way of finding out about what people have to say about a particular business. Do bear in mind though, sometimes the reviews may be something negative about the establishment or one member of staff so you could potentially miss a great massage from another member of staff who hasn’t been reviewed. Also there is a saying which goes ‘a customer who has had a bad experience will tell five people but if they’ve had great experience they may not even tell a soul’. So sometimes you can’t always get a true indication whether you will get a ‘good’ massage treatment or not from a review.

A good massage therapist will have the following qualifications: NVQ level 3, HND Health & Beauty, ITEC, CIBTAC or CIDESCO, there maybe other recognised bodies too but check whether they have a qualification and not just a workshop certificate. Anatomy and physiology is a big part of the training as knowing the muscular system, skeletal system and their functions can make the difference in the quality of massage.

Businesses within many area’s especially London cannot operate without a valid massage license. In certain borough’s even the therapist needs to be licenced. The only way a therapist can get licenced is if they have the relevant qualification. Sometimes you can see the premises license displayed on the wall.

Your massage therapist should ask you to fill in a basic medical questionnaire to establish any medical conditions which may prevent you from having massage. For example any recent injuries or operations, wounds, infections etc. For certain conditions you can still have a massage but may need written permission from your Doctor that its OK to still have massage.

Massage therapists often work with clients who have physical and mental disabilities, and they should be prepared to identify potential contraindications in order to best provide massage therapy to this population. Often, special needs clients may not disclose medical ailments or their need for accommodation until they arrive for the appointment, so it is up to massage therapists to be well educated about situations when it is, and when it is not appropriate to provide massage therapy services.

Special Needs

The term “special needs” is broad, and encompasses a large spectrum of minor to severe needs ranging from mobility assistance, to cognitive impairments, to clients with medical ailments. When special needs clients make an appointment for a massage therapy, they often (but sometimes do not) disclose that they have a physiological or mental impairment that may require special assistance. For massage therapists, it is best to be aware and prepared to work with clients who require additional attention and techniques to provide a quality massage while not compromising the client’s health or safety.

How would you work with special needs clients who require a wheelchair for mobility? How will you approach treatment with a client who has had a full skin graft on his or her back? How do you provide massage therapy to a client with a history of seizures? For many massage therapists, the answers to these questions are often guesses at best, and educating yourself about possible special-needs situations can help you become knowledge and prepare for any unforeseen needs and potential contraindications.

For example, special needs clients with mobility issues may not be able to assume a supine or prone position on a conventional massage table to receive massage therapy. While a massage chair is a possible alternative, some clients may not want to / be able to move from their wheelchair and must be treated in a seated position. By being prepared with supportive pillows and bolsters, massage therapists can massage a client while they are in a comfortable position in their own chair. Be sure to educate your client about what you are doing during the massage therapy session, and why you are doing it. When working with special needs clients, ensuring their emotional and physical comfort should be one of your highest priorities.

Article By :

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.